Tag Archives: social media

Seeing Red

starbucks-red-cup-christian-protest

That’s some tempest in a teapot…er, Starbucks cup…brewing through the newsphere today. Before you could say “Is it Christmas yet?” the entire holiday blew up for the good, simple folks based in Seattle. Did they really think they could go minimalist this season?

All it took was one irate, self-described social media personality to upload a clever, gotcha You Tube video, and Donald Trump weighing in at a pit stop in Illinois to completely upend their Christmas packaging and put them on the defensive. “Maybe we should boycott them,” he said, even though he claims to have “one of the most successful Starbucks in Trump Tower.”

Can you imagine how many meetings were held and how much money was spent for the company to go all PC on us? “We’re embracing the simplicity and the quietness of it. It’s a more open way to usher in the holiday,” said Jeffrey Fields, Starbucks vice president of design and content. In a statement the coffee giant said the red cup allows for customers to put their own drawings and messages on it.

Really? How’s this message: “Nice try, Starbucks! Can’t wait to see what happens next year!”

 

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Filed under Branding, PR Problem

Making Filet Mignon Out of…

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Man sits down with 15 friends at a fancy steak joint and dons a wool cap. Management gives him the boot, saying hats in their restaurant are uncivil attire. Even with a $2,500 bill, man is treated like chopped liver.

This is where the food fight gets juicy. Turns out he’s being treated for cancer and the hat was keeping his head warm. Insulted, and rightly so, his buddies pull out their phones and start tweeting away. They slice the restaurant to shreds.

Rather than ignoring the swelling ranks of angry customers (and future customers), Morton’s Steakhouse in Nashville makes a quick, 21st century recovery — they turn a disaster into an opportunity by donating $2,000 to St. Jude’s Childrens Hospital on behalf of the scorned diner. Oh, and they’ve even offered to underwrite a cancer fundraiser. Nice recovery, Morton’s.

Professor PR is impressed. Aren’t you?

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Filed under food fight, Uncategorized

In Brief: Ring-a-ding-ding Joe Boxer, You Certainly Caught My Eye

I’m feeling a bit like Congressman Francis Underwood, Kevin Spacey’s character in “House of Cards,” when he pauses in the middle of a plot point and turns toward the camera, deadpanning, “I’m surprised it took this long.”

I noticed Joe Boxer’s new commercial for Kmart last night and did a double-take. Are those guys in boxers grinding their hips to the bell chimes of “Jingle Bells?” Wow, now that is one heck of an out-of-boxer Christmas commercial.

By this morning the nay-sayers started coming out of the woodwork (they may have started last night, but I was too busy dreaming of a JB Christmas). The Parents Television Network is outraged. Joe Boxer’s Facebook page is predictably lighting up with lots of tsk-tsks. But Kmart is standing firm, and according to the online poll on AOL, the fans were ahead 64% – 36%.

Take it from Professor PR, that’s what’s called creating a buzz. I hope we’ll see Bobby, Seth and Kenan in their Joes this Saturday night, with a guest appearance by Seth and Justin. Would that be fun?

Why stop at Xmas? How about a little something for the eight nights of Hanukkah? Imagine Halloween next year.  Can’t wait to watch this #ShowYourJoes snowball pick up speed.

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November 19, 2013 · 12:18 pm

This New Year, I resolve to…

…take a good look at my marketing initiatives. Click here to learn more.

Present

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Filed under Marketing, Uncategorized

Student Tweets…Aetna Listens

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An Arizona graduate student with advanced colon cancer turned to Twitter when his insurance company stopped covering his medical bills. Surprisingly, the insurance company’s chief executive tweeted back.

Instead of a PR disaster, it turned into a prime example of how to make lemonade from a bag of lemons. And it’s also a case study of the power of Twitter. Read more.

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Filed under PR

Today’s Lesson

How many times have you heard someone comment, “I never stop learning.” Technology moves fast, and we owe it to ourselves to keep up with it. In looking back at my career on one side or the other of the media profession, I can’t help but laugh about the days before the fax machine.

Flash forward and here we are in the 21st century, thick in the middle of the social media revolution. I know, some of you still don’t get it. But guess what? It’s not going away. Do yourself a favor and spend 15 minutes a day giving yourself an education. Here’s a good start: an article from Mashable describing eight brands that have found success on Facebook…and what we can learn from them. Read the article.

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Filed under PR School

It’s About Time

Here’s a hot topic within the communications industry (and I’m including advertising, marketing, PR and social media, which are tripping all over each other): the adoption of a code of ethics. The Institute of Advertising Ethics today released the following set of eight principles. I think it’s time we professionals step up to the plate.

  • Advertising, public relations, marketing communications, news, and editorial all share a common objective of truth and high ethical standards in serving the public.
  • Advertising, public relations, and all marketing communications professionals have an obligation to exercise the highest personal ethics in the creation and dissemination of commercial information to consumers.
  • Advertisers should clearly distinguish advertising, public relations and corporate communications from news and editorial content and entertainment, both online and offline.
  • Advertisers should clearly disclose all material conditions, such as payment or receipt of a free product, affecting endorsements in social and traditional channels, as well as the identity of endorsers, all in the interest of full disclosure and transparency.
  • Advertisers should treat consumers fairly based on the nature of the audience to whom the ads are directed and the nature of the product or service advertised.
  • Advertisers should never compromise consumers’ personal privacy in marketing communications, and their choices as to whether to participate in providing their information should be transparent and easily made.
  • Advertisers should follow federal, state and local advertising laws, and cooperate with industry self-regulatory programs for the resolution of advertising practices.
  • Advertisers and their agencies, and online and offline media, should discuss privately potential ethical concerns, and members of the team creating ads should be given permission to express internally their ethical concerns.

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Filed under Ethics